learn thai from a white guy Archives - Page 2 of 29 - Learn Thai from a White Guy

How to Order Coffee in Thai

coffee in thai

เอากาแฟเย็นแก้วหนึ่ง

If you’re a coffee or tea drinker, learning a few simple Thai phrases for ordering food and drink is going to make your life a lot easier when in Thailand. Many Thai cafes will automatically add sugar and the staff may not speak English very well so if you want to avoid your drinks being sweet or make sure there’s no milk in it, learn these Thai ordering phrases.

How to Say Coffee in Thai

First off, let’s learn how to pronounce coffee in Thai correctly.

กาแฟ (gah-fae) consists of 2 syllables. กา (gaa) + แฟ (fae) – If you can read a little bit of the Thai script, it’s easy to identify the 2 very distinct vowel sounds happening in this word. However, when we try to write it in English using transliteration we are left with something like gaa-fae which can be very misleading so I highly recommend you click on both syllables a few times and try to remember the correct vowel sound.

If you can pronounce กาแฟ (gaa-fae), then you’re halfway to saying cafe or coffee shop. As with many types of shops in Thai, you just add the word ร้าน in front which means store or shop.

Ordering Coffee in Thai

เอา (ow) + FOOD/DRINK + (# + classifier)

If you don’t know much or any Thai yet, just start by learning the shortest easiest version. Once you’ve said this a few times and are comfortable with it, come back and learn how to add in additional informationใ

*Staff at cafes often shorten the names of the coffee drinks:

Can't read Thai yet? Try a few free lessons from my basic Thai course.
Thai sign that says "a little sweet, super sweet, just let us know!"

ไม่หวานเลย

How to Say “No Sugar” or “Not Sweet” in Thai

It’s Thailand and Thai people like their drinks SWEET so if you go to one of the many cafes that automatically adds sugar or syrup, you need to let them know if you don’t want any. You generally don’t need to use these on things like an americano at places that make real barista-type coffee, but watch out at the big Thai franchises as well as small shops which tend to automatically add sugar unless you tell them not to.

How to Say “Don’t put in milk or sugar” in Thai

If your pronunciation isn’t good yet (because you haven’t learned the script) it’s a really good idea to have a backup sentence just in case you are having trouble getting understood.
These sentences say to not add in any sugar/syrup.

Non-Dairy Alternatives for Your Coffee/Tea

Apart from hipster cafes and Starbucks, it’s still not very common in Thailand for cafes to have non-dairy milk alternatives. It doesn’t hurt to ask, but you may get clueless stares back.

How to Say “I’ll have the usual” in Thai

One of the more useful phrases in Thai is เหมือนเดิม which depending on the context means something like “the usual,” or “the same as last time,” or “the same as before.” You can use this phrase once you are known to the staff a particular place. If you go to the same place a lot, they’ll likely start asking you at some point: เอาเหมือนเดิมมั้ย or เหมือนเดิมมั้ย.

เอาเหมือนเดิม (ow muan doem) – I’ll have the usual / I’ll have the same as last time

Thai Phrases for Ordering Food/Drink:

Here are a few common Thai phrases you might need while ordering food or drink at a cafe or restaurant.

Thai Vocabulary for Ordering Food/Drink

Sizes in Thai

You can use these

Starbucks Sizes in Thai

How to Say I Love You in Thai

 

how-to-say-i-love-you-in-thai

รักต้นไม้บ้างมั้ย = RAK thon-mai baang mai? (Do you LOVE trees?)

How to Say I Love You in Thai?

The quick answer is: chan rak ter or ฉันรักเธอ, but I’d recommend reading further because in context-light language like Thai, choosing the right words and sentences depends on who is talking as well as who you are talking to.

You can click on the blue words and phrases to hear the audio of the Thai word or sentence.

Whether you are studying Thai or just have a significant other that you are trying to impress,  you may be interested in learning how to say I love you in Thai.  Even if you don’t go very deep into Thai language, learning short phrases like this can really win you some bonus points with your partner.

Aside from just knowing how to use and pronounce these Thai phrases correctly, you’ll also hear many of them in Thai songs, Thai soaps and Thai movies.  

In addition to learning the different Thai phrases for “I love you,” we’ll also introduce some of the more common expressions and useful sentences that use the word “love” which is “rak” or รัก in Thai language.

Words for ‘I Love You’ in Thai

how-to-say-i-love-you-in-thai2

หมีมีความรักด้วย

 

The most common expression you’ll probably encounter for “I love you” in Thai across all forms of media is ฉันรักเธอ (chan rak ter).  ฉัน (chan) is generally used as the primary female pronoun, but guys use it in love songs and sometimes on Thai tv and movies. I don’t recommend using this in real life, however if you are male as it can sound a little silly.  You can either drop the pronoun entirely, or use one of the other choices below.  

One thing you will notice pretty quickly in Thai is that the pronouns (like ‘I’ and ‘you’) is often dropped.

When in doubt, just pay attention to how Thai people talk to each other (in real life as opposed to on tv) and copy what they do.  It may take a while sometimes before you can find the answer, but it’s worth the effort.

ฉันรักเธอ (chan rak ter) – I love you.  

ฉัน chan I (primarily used by females)
รัก rak love
เธอ ter you (intimate); she

 

Basic Phrases for “I Love You” in Thai

Choosing the best phrase isn’t always easy.  You’ll probably come across these phrases in textbooks, phrasebooks and other web sites.  I don’t really recommend using them, but they won’t do you any harm.

ผมรักคุณ phom rak khun I love you.  (male speaker)
ฉันรักคุณ chan rak khun I love you.  (female speaker)

 

Thai Sentence Pattern: A รัก B

Here’s the basic sentence pattern saying ‘I love you’ in Thai.

“A loves B,” is what you want to start with, but choosing the correct pronouns to use in Thai can be a little complicated.  Gender, status, age and relationship all have an affect on the words that you should use to refer to both yourself and to whom you are speaking to.

As a learner of the language, you are expected to make mistakes so don’t worry about it too much.  It’s a pretty soft minefield so you won’t lose any limbs. Just keep in mind that the more familiar/intimate/close you are with a person, the more freedom you’ll have to use the informal expressions.

In Thai, it’s very common to drop pronouns when it’s obvious who the target is.  We’ll look at this more in the next section.

Informal ‘I Love You’ in Thai

Since declaring your love for someone tends to be a pretty informal situation to begin with, I’d really recommend becoming familiar with the more informal Thai love phrases you can use with your partner.  You can almost always drop one or both pronouns if it’s clear who is saying what to who.  You can also do this if you just aren’t sure which pronoun to use.

Which Thai pronoun to use?

How to Refer to Your Partner in Thai

Informal;
ผัว poo-ah husband (often used even if not married)
เมีย mia wife (often used even if not married)
Formal:
สามี saa-mee husband
ภรรยา pha-ra-yaa wife

 

General:
แฟน fan boyfriend/girlfriend/partner
ที่รัก thee-rak dear/lover/babe/sweetie

Bonus Thai Love Phrases

 

รักผมรึยัง rak phom rue yang Do you love me yet? (male speaker)
รักฉันรึยัง rak chan rue yang Do you love me yet? (female speaker)
รักไม่เป็น rak mai ppen I don’t know how to love.
ตกหลุมรัก tok lum rak Fall in love (fall-hole-love)
แสดงความรัก sa-dang kwaam rak to show or express love

 

 

Noun vs Verbs in Thai

The word รัก (rak) that we looked at above is going to act as a verb in most cases.  In order to form the noun version of “love” in Thai, you just add the word ความ (kwaam) in front of รัก (rak).  You’ll use the noun form in sentences where you are talking about the concept or idea of love.

Final Thoughts

There are plenty of ways to say “I love you” in Thai and this list is not exhaustive, but hopefully we’ve given you enough to get started with.  Remember, that part of learning a language (or any skill!) involves making mistakes and embracing this early on will make the journey go much smoother.

Want to Learn to Read Thai?

Perhaps, the most important part of learning Thai is mastering the script, sounds and tone rules.   It’s very difficult to learn the correct pronunciation using any type of English transliteration and the sooner you get away from it, the faster your Thai will improve.

Try a couple free lessons from my Thai foundation course which teaches everything you need to know about the script, sound system and tone rules of Thai.

5 Thai Slang Phrases You Need to Know

Here are 5 of the more useful and well known Thai slang phrases that have been used lately. There are always new Thai slang phrases popping up on social media and it’s difficult to keep up with them all.  As language learners, it can be harder for us to notice every time a new useful word or phrases appears on the internet so it’s a good idea to keep an eye out.  

to be nosy = phueak (เผือก)

You’ll hear this word a lot from younger Thai people.  While เผือก (phueak) actually means “taro,” Thais started using it in place of the word it derives from, “เสือก” (sueak) means the same thing, but sounds much harsher and can come across as rude.  

สมชัย ชอบมาเผือกตลอด – Somchai is always nosing into other people’s business.  (Somcha chawp maa phueak tha-lawt)

Cute(sy = frung-fring (ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง)

These Thai slang for “cute” can be a little confusing as which one is best to use depends on the situation.

It tends to be used by girls when talking about stuff that looks really cutesy like if there was a tiny cute stuff rabbit attached to a keychain. ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง (frung-fring) is also often used a lot when referring to a nice camera.  So if someone feels or suggests a camera makes people look cuter or thinner you may hear กล้องฟรุ้งฟริ้ง (klawng frung-fring)

มุ้งมิ้ง (mung-ming) and  ตะมุตะมิ (thamu-thami) are interchangeable in most situations and are more likely to be used to describe 

  • ดูคู่รักคู่นั้นซิ พวกเขาดูน่ารักมุ้งมิ้งมากเลย
  • สองตายายคู่นี้น่ารักตะมุตะมิสุดๆ

Perfect; exactly = เป๊ะเว่อร์

If you know both เป๊ะ and เว่อร์, you can probably guess the meaning of this Thai slang.

เป๊ะ means “exactly” while เว่อร์ (wer) comes from (over) in English.  However, เว่อร์ in Thai is used to mean something like “over the top.” 

เป๊ะเว่อร์ means completely or exactly perfect.  It’s similar to “nailed it” or when a successful outcome is exactly like or better than expected. 

Attractive; good-looking = งานดี (ngaan dii)

If you’ve ever gone to any type of party or event with a Thai woman, you may have heard this word slip out.  

แฟนของแจนงานดีมากอ่ะ – Jan’s partner is good-looking.

Dirty look; angry look = mawng raeng (มองแรง) 

This slang word is a bit negative.  If you make somebody angry and they turn and and glare at you, that’s a “mawng raeng.”  Sometimes, people use it on social media to express that they are angry, but it can also be used jokingly or when teasing someone.

 

ปัจจุบันมีคำศัพท์ใหม่ๆ เกิดขึ้นบนโลก Social media มากมาย นี่ก็เป็นสาเหตุที่เราจะต้องเรียนรู้สิ่งใหม่ๆ ที่เปลี่ยนแปลงรอบตัวอยู่ตลอดเวลา ซึ่งการเปลี่ยนแปลงนี้ก็มาจากยุคสมัย ที่มีการนำสื่อออนไลน์อย่าง Social media เข้ามาเกี่ยวข้อง การพูดคุยสื่อสารกันจนเป็นเรื่องง่ายดายและหลายครั้งที่มีการใช้คำศัพท์ คำย่อ ในการพูดคุยเพื่อสร้างความบันเทิงให้กั

เพราะเราเห็นถึงความสำคัญในการเรียนรู้ ศัพท์สแลงไทย หรือ ศัพท์ที่วัยรุ่นไทยมักใช้ในการพูดคุยสื่อสารกันบนโลก Social media ในบทความนี้เราจึงพร้อมยกตัวอย่าง “ 5 ศัพท์สแลงไทย ปี 2562 ” มาให้คุณเข้าใจความหมายและสามารถใช้ตามกันได้

ตามมาดูความหมาย  “ 5 ศัพท์สแลงไทย ” กัน

เผือก = การยุ่งเรื่องชาวบ้าน

นี่ก็เป็นคำศัพท์สแลงที่วัยรุ่นไทยนิยมใช้แทนคำหยาบ ที่มาจากคำว่า เสือก แปลได้ว่า การยุ่งเรื่องชาวบ้านเช่นกัน ชาวเน็ตวัยรุ่นจึงเลือกใช้คำที่มีการออกเสียงใกล้เคียงกันเพื่อให้อีกฝ่ายเข้าใจในความหมายที่เข้าหมายถึง เช่น นาย A เป็นคนที่ชอบอยากรู้เรื่องคนอื่นไปทั่ว นาย A ก็เป็นคนที่ชอบ “เผือก” นั่นเอง

ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง, มุ้งมิ้ง, ตะมุตะมิ = น่ารัก, ทำตัวน่ารัก

คำศัพท์เหล่านี้หลายคนก็ยังมีความสับสน ซึ่งการใช้คำสแลงนี้ก็จะมีความแตกต่างกันไปแต่ละสถานการณ์ คำว่า ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง ผู้หญิงมักจะใช้กับสิ่งของ ที่ดูหวานแหวว น่ารักแบบที่สาวหวานชอบ เช่น “พวงกุญขนกระต่ายดูฟรุ้งฟริ้ง น่ารักมากเลย” ส่วนคำว่า มุ้งมิ้ง และ ตะมุตะมิ จะมีความหมายใกล้เคียงกันมากที่สุด เช่น “ดูคู่รักคู่นั้นซิ พวกเขาดูน่ารักมุ้งมิ้งมากเลย” หรือ “สองตายายคู่นี้น่ารักตะมุตะมิสุดๆ”

*สมัยนี้นิยมใช้คำว่า ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง กับกล้องถ่ายรูป เช่นกล้องฟรุ้งฟริ้ง ความหมายประมาณว่า ถ้าใช้กล้องฟรุ้งฟริ้งถ่าย รูปที่ออกมาจะสวยเนียนขาว หรือว่าหน้าจะดูสดใสหรือตัวดูผอมกว่าจริง มักจะใข้กับ selfie camera

เป๊ะเว่อร์ = สมบูรณ์แบบมาก

เชื่อว่านี่เป็นคำศัพท์ที่คุณสามารถเดาความหมายได้จากคำว่า เป๊ะ ที่แปลได้ว่า “ถูกต้อง (Exactly)” ส่วนคำว่า เว่อร์ เป็นคำขยายที่แปลว่า “มากเกิน (Over)” ซึ่งนี่อาจหมายความเชิงลบ เช่น การทำอะไรมากเกินก็ได้ แต่เมื่อเรานำมารวมเข้ากับความหมายเชิงบวกอย่างคำว่า เป๊ะเวอร์ ก็จะหมายถึง “สมบูรณ์แบบที่สุด! หรือ เลิศเลอเพอร์เฟ็กต์ (Nailed i!)” ยกตัวอย่าง คุณนกแต่งตัวมางานอีเว้นท์คืนนี้ได้เป๊ะเว่อร์ หมายความว่า คุณนกแต่งตัวคืนนี้ได้สวยสุดๆ นั่นเอง

งานดี = หน้าตาดี

หากคุณเคยไปสังสรรค์หรือไปงานปาร์ตี้กับเพื่อนสาว บางครั้งคุณอาจจะได้ยินคำนี้หลุดมาจากปากเพื่อนสาวอยู่บ่อยครั้ง เมื่อผู้หญิงเจอคนที่หน้าตาดี ก็มักจะอุทานออกมากับเพื่อนสาวด้วยกันว่า งานดี ยกตัวอย่าง แจนเห็นผู้ชายที่เธอชอบ เธอเลยถามเพื่อนเธอว่า ผู้ชายคนนั้นงานดีหรือเปล่า? หรืออีกตัวอย่าง แฟนของแจนงานดีมากอ่ะ ก็หมายถึง แฟนของแจนหน้าตาดีหรือหล่อนั่นเอง

มองแรง = การมองแบบสายตาโกรธเกรี้ยว

คำสแลง มองแรง คำนี้เป็นคำที่ออกแนวเชิงลบ “เมื่อคุณทำให้ใครโกรธคุณขึ้นมา จนเข้าหันกลับมามองคุณด้วยสายตายโกธเกรี้ยวหรือไม่พอใจ” นั่นก็คือ การมองแรง เป็นอีกคำศัพท์วัยรุ่นที่ใช้แทนอารมณ์นี้การส่งข้อความผ่าน Social Media เพื่อให้เพื่อนของคุณสามารถเห็นภาพอารมณ์ของคุณได้ นอกจากนี้แล้ว การมองแรง ยังสามารถแปลเป็นการอิจฉาได้อีก เช่น แจ๋วซื้อกระเป๋ามาใหม่และโพสลงใน Facebook แล้วมีเพื่อนมาคอมเม้นต์ว่า มองแรง ซึ่งนี่ก็จะแปลได้ว่า “อิจฉา เป็นการหยอกเล่น” นั่นเอง

ทั้งหมดนี้ก็เป็นการใช้ 5 ศัพท์สแลงไทย ที่คุณควรเรียนรู้ เพื่อใช้ในการสนทนาพูดคุยได้อย่างสนุกสนานมากขึ้นกับคนท้องถิ่น ที่ซึ่งการเรียนรู้คำศัพท์เหล่านี้ก็จะทำให้คุณสามารถเข้าหาและตีสนิทผู้คนได้เป็นอย่างมาก

 

 

How to Say YES in Thai

CHAI doesn’t mean yes.

The YES word that you want doesn’t really exist in Thai. The first word you’ll come across is ใช่ (chai), but that’s usually not what you should be using. If you are being asked a question, you generally say YES, by repeating the key word back to the person asking, or you negate that word to say NO, you are not doing that verb.

As is often the case in language learning, asking questions like “How to say YES in Thai?” isn’t the right question. You often can’t just translate a word into another language and expect it to function the same way.

In Thai, you say the equivalent of YES or NO based on the question. Note that we don’t need to use any pronouns at all here. If ใช่ (chai) isn’t in the question, then it’s probably best to not use it in the answer.

How to Say Yes in Thai – The Quick Answer

ใช่ (chai) – yes (*actually means “It is” or “that’s right”)

In Thai, you say the equivalent of YES or NO based on the question. Note that we don’t need to use any pronouns at all here. If ใช่ (chai) isn’t in the question, then it’s probably best to not use it in the answer.

How to Answer Yes / No Questions in Thai

Not unlike English, the answer to most simple Thai questions is already inside the question.  In Thai, we usually drop the pronouns (you/I/he/she/etc) if it’s clear from context who is being referred to.

So, if you ask a question like “Where are you going?” we only need to say “GO + Question-Particle.”  The particle word MAI ( ไหม)  with a rising tone acts as a YES/NO question marker.

Q: ไปไหม (ppai mai) – Are you going? [Go + QUESTION_PARTICLE]

  • A1: ไป – (ppai) (I’m) going.

The falling tone MAI ( ไม่) means “no” or “not” and to answer the previous question you just say “not go” which works exactly like “I’m not going” does in English.

Q: ชอบพิซซ่าไหม (chawp phit-sa mai) – Do you like pizza?

When to Use CHAI

The only time you really want to use CHAI ( ใช่) is when someone asks you a question ending in …CHAI MAI? ( ใช่ไหม).    CHAI (ใช่) really means “It is,” or sometimes “That is right.”  It is not used like “YES” in English so as soon as you become aware of this, stop using it like that.

For example, if someone wants to confirm that you like pizza, rather than just ask you, you may hear this:

Q: ชอบกินพิซซ่าใช่มั้ย – (chawp kin pissa chai mai) – (You) like eating pizza right?

Other Common Thai Sentence Patterns:

Another super common pattern that you’ll hear is …. ru yang? (รึยัง) which literally means “or not yet?” but is used ALL THE TIME.   It sounds weird in English if we translate it word for word, but this is the pattern you in use if you want to ask questions like these:

Q: กินข้าวรึยัง (kin khaao ru yang?) – have you eaten yet? (lit. eat rice or not yet)

Q: มีแฟนรึยัง (mee fan ru yang?) – Do you have a gf/bf/husband/wife yet?

Now, there are many different question patterns in Thai.  Here’s another example where you would never use ใช่ (chai).

Q: พรุ่งนี้อยากไปดูหนังกันมั้ย – (phrung nee yaak ppai duu nang gan mai?) – Do you want to go see a movie tomorrow?

Want to Learn to Read Thai?

A really important part of learning Thai is mastering the script and sounds.   It’s very difficult to learn the correct pronunciation using any type of English transliteration.

Try a couple free lessons from my Thai foundation course which teaches everything you need to know about the script, sound system and tone rules of Thai.

How to Eat Vegan in Thailand

People often wonder how I could possibly ever survive here in Thailand as a vegan. Considering I’ve been here well over 10 years and I still haven’t died, I think I’m doing fairly well. There is veggie food all around you, and I’m not just talking the salad shops that have sprung up in the last 2 years or. There are tons of veggie spots in town. On Suthep road alone, there are 3 lined up in a row each doing their own thing and there are 3 more down back roads within 5 minute walking distance from the first 3.

There are 2 main types of vegetarian/vegan eats in Thailand and while they both avoid meat entirely, there are a some important differences.

เจ (jeh) Vegan versus มังสวิรัติ (Mangsawira) Vegetarian

มังสวิรัติ [mang sa wi rut] comes from the Sanskrit mamsa, which means “meat” and virat which means “without.” So this is essentially an acceptable translation of “vegetarian.” As with in English, some people may or may not eat eggs and/or dairy.
เจ [jeh] comes from the Chinese word 齋 (jai1/jaai1) which is also the source for the equivalent words in Korean, Japanese, and Vietnamese.

If you happen to be reading this in October, then you are in luck, my friend. This is when the Vegetarian Festival (เทศกาลกินเจ) happens. During that time almost everybody gets on the jeh train for a bit. Some people eat jeh for the entire month, the entire 10 day festival, and most franchise restaurants (Black Canyon, MK, etc) offer at least one jeh option, but some actually have a full jeh menu during the festival. The only downside is that a lot of regular jeh restaurants don’t really do anything special during this time except get a lot more crowded than usual and in some cases raise their prices. Yay for jeh.
As far as the food goes, the main difference between Jeh and Mung is that real Jeh forbids eating food with really strong flavours and/or smells as it is believed that each one does harm to different parts of the body. This includes stuff like chives, garlic, parsley, and onions.

So what does all this mean for you? Real Jeh food will always be vegan. But, you need to be careful as some jeh places will have 1 or 2 Mung options which may contain egg. And even though jeh avoids really strong flavours, it can still taste pretty awesome. They often make all kinds of fake vegan meats to help ease the suffering of all those poor meat eaters who torture themselves by abstaining from me for a meal, a day or the entire vegetarian festival.

What are my choices?

  • Jeh – Technically vegan, but watch out for those handful of places that will have one or 2 dishes with egg. Jeh spots will almost always have one or more yellow flags posted both inside and out. The flag will either say เจ, the Chinese character the word is based on or both. They often use a Chinese-y font so sometimes the word เจ looks a bit like the number “17”.
  • Mung(sawirat) – Vegetarian w/eggs. As far as things eaten with rice, dairy is pretty rare, but pastries and other sweets sold at Mung places may contain butter, cream and/or milk.

What do I do if I can’t find a jeh place?

Some regular restaurants may attempt to accommodate you or at least make you think they are doing so.

How to Avoid Eating Animal Products in Thailand:

More than anything else, you’ll want to watch out for oyster sauce.  Vegetable dishes at regular restaurants will almost always be cooked with oyster sauce. Oyster sauce is dark, oily and gummy. And it comes from oysters! If you don’t want it in there, you gotta say so. You’ll know if it’s not in there, because they will probably only have used soy sauce and vegetable oil. So it may be bland, but vegan.
Solution: ไม่ ใส่ น้ำ-มัน-หอย (mai sai nam-man-hoi) – Don’t put in oyster sauce.

Fish sauce is another standard ingredient in a lot of (almost all!) Thai dishes.
Solution: ไม่ ใส่ น้ำ-ปลา (mai sai nam-plaa)
Soup broth – At non-jeh places, even if they say there isn’t any meat in it, it will still have meat stock so skip the soup.

Thai Dishes that usually Contain Egg:

  • ข้าวผัด – fried rice (khaao pad)
  • ผัดไทย – pad thai
  • ผัดซีอิ๊ว – pad see-yu

Notice the word ผัด (pad) appears in all 3 of the words above. ผัด = stir-fried/sauteed

How to say “Don’t put egg in”
ไม่ ใส่ ไข่ (mai sai kai) = don’t put in egg

Even if you ask for something jeh, they don’t always really know what that means so you are better off making it as clear as possible.

Full Sentence: เอา ข้าวผัด เจ ไม่ใส่ไข่ (ow kaaw pad jeh mai sai kai) – I’d like fried rice (jeh) without egg.

First thing you want to do is find out if they are willing to try to make you something jeh/mung. And just because they tell you they can, doesn’t mean they aren’t going to forget and give you something wish oyster sauce or fish sauce. Aside from being a tonal language, Thai also contains a whole lot more vowel sounds than English and when you say the vowels wrong, people probably won’t understand you. Be patient with them as you are the one who needs something from them and may not be able to
speak their language.

I remember this one time, a buddy of mine ordered a bottle of water and got a coconut, so watch out friends, watch out.

Look for the yellow flag!