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How to Say What is Your Name in Thai

One of the most important phrases you’ll need to know when you’re meeting new people is asking their name.  Below we will break down everything you need to know about how to say “What’s your name?” in Thai.

How you (should) speak to people in Thai will often depend on a few factors such as your age in relation to theirs, the situation or the person’s status so we’ll cover both the formal/polite and informal sentences you can use when speaking with Thai people.

If you are learning Thai, you might consider learning the basics of the Thai alphabet and sounds. It usually takes around 10-20 hours of study to grasp how everything works and it’ll go a long way towards speeding up your progress in Thai language.

how to say what is your name in thai cartoon

ชื่อ อะไร

 

Formal/Polite: How to Say “What is your name?” in Thai

First let’s take a look at the formal way to say ‘what is your name’ in Thai. Thai people might use this in a setting when they are speaking with older people or people who are higher in the social or work hierarchy.  This could be used in the context of a business meeting, for example. 

The structure of ‘what is your name’ in Thai looks like this:

  • (Pronoun) +
    ชื่อ (not found)
    [cheu] + อะไร [ah-rai] + (polite particle)

Example:

  • คุณชื่ออะไร (not found)
    (khun cheu ah-rai) – What is your name?

Often when we speak to a person in Thai that we don’t know, someone older or someone who has some level of status, we’ll add on the polite gender based particles:  ครับ Khrap (male) and ค่ะ Kha (females).

    • คุณชื่ออะไร (not found)
      + ครับ (khun cheu ah-rai + khrap) – What is your name? (male speaker)
    • คุณชื่ออะไร (not found)
      + ค่ะ (khun cheu ah-rai + kha) – What is your name? (female speaker)

If you are in a formal setting or a situation where you don’t know who you are speaking with yet (such as on the phone) such as at the immigration office, at a bank or business meeting, it’s probably best to use this formal version of “what is your name?” in Thai.  But for normal social settings, you can use the informal version of ‘what is your name’ which we cover later in this article.

Formal: How to Say ‘My Name is…’

If you are in a formal setting, it is possible that you will be asked the formal version of ‘what is your name’ so it’s important to learn the formal response of ‘my name is…’

The structure of “my name is…” in Thai looks like this:

Male Speaker:

  • ผมชื่อ (not found)
    ____  ครับ – My name is ____
    • ผม (phom) – I; me (male pronoun)
    • ชื่อ (not found)
      (chue) – name
    • ครับ (khrap) – polite male particle

Female Speaker:

  • ฉันชื่อ (not found)
    ____  ค่ะ – My name is ____ (female)

Sample Dialogue 1: 

  • Thai Female:
    • คุณชื่ออะไรค่ะ (not found)
      – What is your name?  (polite + female speaker)
  • John:
    • ผมชื่อจอห์นครับ (not found)
      – My name is John (polite+ male speaker)

Sample Dialogue 2: 

  • Thai Male:
    • คุณชื่ออะไรครับ (not found)
      – What is your name? (polite + male speaker)
  • Sarah:
    • ฉันชื่อซาร่าห์ค่ะ (not found)
      (chan cheu Sarah kha) – My name is Sarah (polite + female speaker)

Bonus Tips:

*When we say “formal” or “polite,” it’s hard to define every possible situation you might encounter, but here are a few good ground rules to follow:

  1.  You would never use “คุณ (khun) – you” with children and very rarely with people much younger than you.  This word has a feeling similar to “Mr” or “Mrs” in Thai so while it’s not likely anyone will correct you, it will sound very strange.
  2. It’s not IMPOLITE to drop pronouns, so if you aren’t sure which pronoun to use (or if you should use one) it’s always ok to drop them.  Just use the polite gender particle ครับ / ค่ะ (khrap/kha) and you will still be speaking politely.

Informal: How to Ask “What is your name?” in Thai

Part of crafting the most natural sentence in Thai language is knowing whether to use a pronoun at all and in situations where they are appropriate, deciding which one to use.

As we’ve seen above, even in formal setting you can drop the pronoun คุณ (khun) entirely and just make sure to add the polite gender-based particle ครับ/ค่ะ (khrap/kha).

In some social settings you can may hear or want to use to use an informal pronoun.

Thai speakers will often use

พี่ (not found)
(pii) ‘older brother/sister’ and น้อง (nong) ‘younger brother/sister’ when speaking with close friends, acquaintances, siblings and strangers alike.  It is even common for Thai speakers to call their spouse or partner
พี่ (not found)
(pii) or น้อง (nong).

Sample Informal Situation:

You eat at a restaurant or a cafe a number of times and start to get to know one or more of the staff at the shop and you’d like to ask their name*.  Since you are a customer, they may use the polite word for “you,” คุณ (khun) + your name to address you.  If they are clearly younger than you, you can refer to them as น้อง (nawng) which means “younger sibling.”

  • ขอ ถาม ชื่อ หน่อย (+ ครับ / ค่ะ) – (khaw thaam chue noi + khrap/kha) – May (I) ask your name (+ polite particle) ?
    • ขอ …. หน่ยอ (khaw …. noi) – Can I please have ….. ?**
    • ถาม (thaam) – to ask
    • ชื่อ (chue) – name

* In most cases, when you ask a Thai person their name, they will give you their nickname.  Thai names tend to be quite long and are rarely used informally.

**Check out our posts on ordering beer or coffee to learn more about this very important sentence pattern.

Choosing the Right Thai Pronoun:

Thai has a lot of pronouns and I don’t recommend trying to learn them all at once.  The easy answer in all situations is to use คุณ (khun) which is the polite way to say “you” in Thai.  However, it’s rarely the best or most natural answer.   Thai culture has a built-in friendliness/closeness within a status-based hierarchy.

The pronoun you use is at least partially determined by your age in relation to the other person.  So your friend who is 1 week older than you is your พี่ (phii).  If you had a twin brother/sister that was born 5 minutes before you, they are also your พี่ (phii) as they are a bit older.  You can use this word up to approximately the age of your parents.

Although these terms are somewhat informal (a student wouldn’t refer to their teacher as

พี่ (not found)
 (pii) for example), it is still perfectly polite and respectful to use these terms in most every day social situations as it displays a level of friendliness and familiarity which is a natural part of Thai culture.

Sample Informal Situation:

You shop at a market, or a food stall you can use these terms if the food seller is considerably older than you.  There isn’t a set age difference, but think in terms of your parent’s age.  If you are 25-35 and the food seller is 50 or 70, you should use the terms for “aunt” or “uncle” in Thai.

In these situations, can just refer to them as “aunt” or “uncle,” and it isn’t necessary or unfriendly to not ask their name.

  • ป้า (ppaa) auntie
  • ลุง (not found)
    ​(loong) uncle

Go Practice Speaking Thai:

Now that you know how to ask ‘what is your name?’ in Thai for almost every situation you will find yourself in, it’s time to get out there and start making some friends. You will be sure to impress your new found Thai friends and make a great first impression.  Looking for more basic Thai language content?  I’d recommend learning all the different ways to greet people in Thai with this post on saying hello.   Looking for Thai language tutors?  Check out iTalki.

Or maybe you are looking to get conversational or fluent in Thai?  If so, check out my Thai core skills program: the Learn Thai Inner Circle

*While we have added transliteration (and AUDIO!) to the Thai words and phrases in the above Thai lesson, if you would like to be able to speak Thai conversationally (or fluently!) at some point, we strongly recommend that you learn to read the Thai script.   It can appear intimidating, but being able to separate the sounds of Thai from English (and/or your own native language) will make going deep into Thai language much easier.

How to Say Who in Thai

Here’s How to Say Who in Thai

“Who” is one of the first question words you should learn in Thai (or any) language because you’ll need to use this word every day starting from day 1.   Below, we’ll show you a few common phrases that use the word who, we’ll also break down the spelling in Thai so you can get an idea how the Thai alphabet works.

The Thai word for Who is:

how to say who in Thai = KRAI + picture of boy covering eyes of man

ใครอ่ะ

How to Spell Who in Thai:

Even if you can’t read the Thai script yet, it might be interesting to break this Thai word down to see how it works.

The letter in the middle is an aspirated “K” sound.  Aspirated just means that there will be a strong blast of air when you pronounce this Thai letter.  It’s just like the K sound in “kite” “keep” or “kill.”

ค – Kh 

Click on any of the following Thai words to hear this letter in action.  Don’t worry about the rest of the word right now.  Just listen for the first consonant K sound.

  1. คุณ (khun) – you
  2. คน (khon) – person; people
  3. ควาย (kwaai) – buffalo

The 2nd letter which is all the way to the right in this word is the Thai “R” sound.  In Thai, just like in English, you’ll find that sometimes, 2 consonants can share the same vowel sound.  *The Thai R (ร) is trilled, but in informal daily conversation, most people do not pronounce the full trill so don’t worry if you can’t say it perfectly yet.

ร – R (trilled)

In the word for “who,” the K and the R come together to create a คร- KR- sound.   This is called a “consonant cluster” and you already know how to say it even if you’ve never heard that term before.  Here are some examples of consonant clusters in English.  I’ll BOLD the clustered letters to make it easier to pick them out.

  1. Crazy
  2. Brett
  3. Three

The Thai Vowel: ใอ (ai)

The symbol on the left of ใคร (krai) is the vowel.  This vowel sound makes an “ai” or “eye” sound.  Click on the following Thai word to hear how it’s pronounced: ใอ

Here are some basic Thai words which use the ใอ (ai) vowel:

Example Sentences with the Thai Word “Who”

How to Say “Who” in Formal and Informal Thai

Like in English, asking someone who they are should be done in a polite way to avoid sounding rude. If a Thai person asks this question they will usually add a male or female polite particle.

An informal, sometimes impolite particle can also be used depending on certain factors like your relationship with the person you are asking.

Formal Thai Phrases with Who

You should note that these polite particles don’t always sound the same when you hear them spoken in public. Often, the R (ร) in “Khrap” is dropped and it ends up being pronounced as “Khap” (คับ).

Informal Thai Phrases with Who

The particle “na” (นะ) can be added to the sentence to make the question sound softer. Who are you? –

This might be used in a situation where two possible love interests have bumped into each other. Na is not impolite but should not be used in very formal circumstances. 

A Very Impolite Thai Particle

Lastly, the impolite particle can be used at the end of the sentence: wa (วะ)

Imagine a man picks up the telephone of his girlfriend and another man is on the line. This might cause him to be jealous (He’s the jealous type), and so the sentence may not sound very polite at all. The man may simply ask  – “Krai wa?” (ใคร วะ) or “Krai phoud wa?” (ใคร พูด วะ). In English this would translate as something like “Who the hell is this?” or “Who the hell is speaking?”  

Be very careful with the WA (วะ) particle.   If you use it with someone you don’t know it is very aggressive and you could get yourself into trouble.  Many Thai people will use it amongst their close friends so if you stick around long enough you are going to hear this particle.  I don’t recommend using it until you have gotten a bit deeper into Thai language.  

*In the Thai language “who” is not used in the middle of a sentence. Thais don’t say, “That’s the guy WHO teaches me English.” In Thai, it could sound more like, “That guy. He teaches me English.”   

WHO in Thai is strictly a question word.  

*In the Thai language “who” is not used in the middle of a sentence. Thais don’t say, “That’s the guy who teaches me English.” In Thai, it could sound more like, “That guy. He teaches me English.”

Quick Thai Script Review:

  • ค is a K sound (Aspirated which means it has a strong blast of air when like the C sound in CUT)
  • ร is a R sound (Officially a trilled R sound, but it’s not usually trilled in normal conversation)
  • ใ is a vowel that sounds like “ai” and goes on the LEFT side of the consonant it is attached to.

All together, that spells: ใคร or WHO in Thai.

How to Say Good Morning in Thai

Many cultures use different greetings depending on the time of day.  While Thai language has a couple phrases that are similar to “good morning,” “good afternoon,” and “good night,” Thai people do not commonly use these very much in daily life.

However, you may hear them on Thai dramas or in Thai movies, so it’s ok to learn it.  If you want to know how Thai people say good morning to each other at different times of the day, below are both the formal and informal phrases you’ll come across either in book, classes or other websites.  Be sure to read to the end as that’s where the most common phrases are.

good morning in thai

How to Say Good Morning in Thai

Formal Thai for “Good Morning” Part 1: (What Thai language books and other websites tell you to say…)

—- Examples:

  1. อรุณสวัสดิ์ (ah-roon-sa-wat) Good morning
  2. สวัสดีตอนเช้า (sa-wat-dee ttawn-chao) Good morning

*Disclaimer: We mention these phrases, because it’s the only way to rank this page high enough on Google that you will ever see it, but I will stress that Thai people don’t say these 2 phrases and neither should you.  Except, perhaps to be silly.  If you use it (especially ah-roon-sa-wat), you will probably get a laugh or a smile so there may be some value in learning these 2 Thai phrases  just to get a reaction out of people.

Google is getting better at recognizing what’s actually used as opposed to what the top websites might tell you.

google translate search of "good morning" in thai

Don’t use SA-WAT-DEE-TAWN-CHAO

Formal Thai for “Good Morning” Part 2: (What Thai people REALLY say)

—- Examples:

  1. สวัสดี ครับ/ค่ะ (sawat-dee + khrap/kha) – Hello + (male/female polite particle)
  2. ทานข้าวรึยัง (taan khaao rue yang) – Have you eaten yet?*

*ทาน (taan) is a slightly more polite/formal word for “to eat” in Thai.  If you frequent the same restaurant or cafe, as the staff  start getting to know you, they may use this word for a time instead of กิน (kin) which also means “to eat.”   Using ทาน (taan) instead of กิน (kin) is more formal/polite and maintains a level of distance from the person being spoken to.

Informal Thai for “Good Morning” (What you should use with your friends)

  1. หวัดดี ครับ/ค่ะ (wat-dee + khrap/kha) – Hi
  2. กินข้าวรึยัง (kin khaao rue yanng?) – Have you eaten yet?*

You’ll use *”กิน (kin) – to eat” most of the time when speaking with friends or colleagues.

Want to Know More Thai Greetings and Basic Phrases?

To learn all about the best Thai greetings to use in every situation, check out our “How to Say Hello in Thai” post.  In that post, you’ll find the 2 most useful phrases in the Thai language so don’t miss out.

Want to learn to speak and read Thai language?  Check out my Thai foundation online course here or sign up below to try some free lessons from the program.

 

I Flew from Bangkok to Chiang Mai during Covid-19

After a month of accommodation problems in Hua Hin and Cha Am due to provincial governors trying their best to make it really hard for covid wildcards (foreigners and to some extent non-residents) to stay in their respective provinces,  I finally gave up on the beach for a bit and decided I’d fly back to Chiang Mai this past Saturday (May 10th) to see what’s happening.  

While I certainly spent a lot of time trying to dig through Thai provincial announcements, it can be difficult to find accurate, up-to-date information.  This post that went up a few days before I flew at least gave me the feeling that I could fly in without TOO much hassle.

At Don Muang Airport

I wasn’t sure what to expect so I arrived at Don Muang Airport maybe 3.5 hours before my flight.  There was a bunch of people, but much quieter than usual.  There was no check in line so once I got to the airline counter I was able to check in immediately.  There wasn’t anything different than usual other than we were both wearing masks and there was hand sanitizer on the counter.  

Airport Security

no lines at airport security

สะดวก ง่าย เร็ว

Security was also quick and easy.  There weren’t any lines to get through.  There was only one security line open and there were a couple people going in before me, but it only took a moment to get through.  Once past security, it was a lot more striking how quiet everything was.  To the left, the hallway was dark.  To the right, there were a handful of things open including Starbucks, but not much.  I walked to the lounge area and the Miracle lounge was open while the Coral lounge was closed.  I didn’t go inside.    

Just past security, it was super quiet.

เงียบเลย

Starbucks for the Win

Starbucks was open, but not much else so I sat there and worked for a while.  Actually, if everything was open, I’d still probably would have sat there a bit and then gone to the lounge.

starbucks don muang during covid

Boarding the Plane

ใส่หน้ากาก

At the gate people were sitting spaced apart.  When they announced boarding they told everyone to keep their distance, but it didn’t work very well. 

On the plane, middle seats were blocked off as expected.   My flight still had a fair number of people on it.  As far as I could tell, almost everyone was Thai.  I only noticed a handful of foreigners besides myself.   

There was some seat drama where an old person just sat in the row behind me, but it was someone else’s seat.  So the flight attendant just put them in my row.  There was a guy with a very unpleasant sounding cough in the row behind me which made me wince a few times.  

Not long after take off, a flight attendant came by to talk to the other guy in my row and said that as he was a ข้าราชการ [khaa-ratcha-gaan] (government employee), and normally entitled to a free meal, they couldn’t serve food on the flight so they gave him a voucher so he could get some food at the airport after landing.  I assume the government has deals with all the airlines so ข้าราชการ can get free food.  

On the plane, they passed out a form to fill out.  It asked where for the following information:

  • Flight + Seat Number
  • Flying to/from
  • Name / Date / Age 
  • Accommodation with a note in Thai with a pretty amusing mistake.
    • What they meant to write was; (โปรดระบุให้ชัดเจน) please specify (the address) clearly
      • โปรด [pprod] please (formal/written only You never need to say this ever)
      • ระบุ [ra-bu] indicate; specify 
      • ชัดเจน [chat-jen] clearly
    • What they wrote was โปรดระบุให้ จัดเจน 
      • จัดเจน [jat-jen] to be experienced or skilled at something (I don’t think I’ve ever heard a Thai person say this so don’t worry much about this word.)

Upon landing, they asked everyone to stay seated so they could control the exit flow rate and add in some social distancing.  They let everyone in the C seats exit first which kind of defeats the purpose of paying more to sit up front so you can deplane faster.  If you do book a seat on Nok, just make sure to choose a C seat in case they do that every time.  Most people adhered to it at least for a minute or so and then most people just stood up.  I don’t think there really was any more distance than usual. 

After exiting the plane, there were 2 people at the top of the escalator to slow down the line and keep people a metre apart.  

Arriving at Chiang Mai International Airport

Once you get to the bottom, there’s a sign which just says “foreigner” pointing off to the side.  I think if you looked Thai enough, you might be able to slip by this, but I’m not sure.   They didn’t ask me any questions, my appearance was enough to get me sent off to the side.  In the farang corner, there was a gaggle of immigration officers buzzing around. 

They wanted to confirm that the address I wrote was correct, they asked for my phone number and that of a Thai person and also asked where I was coming from.  She also looked at my entry stamp which expired a few weeks ago.  

It was all pretty friendly and there were the usual questions like “How is it that you can speak Thai like this?”  in addition to covid related questions like “What country were you in before coming here?’  I told her all the details and I also told my story of getting essentially pushed from province to province due to accommodation problems.   It took less than 10 minutes.  

After she walked me over to the door where i had to go through the entire spiel with a doctor who had a table setup at the exit doors from the baggage claim.  That took a little longer as I had to convince the doctor that I had a place to hide out in for a while (at least 2 weeks) and that I wasn’t going to run around spreading the disease.  She said that I should self-quarantine.  I should point out that of all the people on the plane (maybe 50 or so?), it seems a little silly to only ask me to self quarantine.   Anyways, I’m hiding in my room as I write this so don’t worry, internet shamers.

If you are thinking of flying to Chiang Mai, I would make sure you have all of your bases covered.  I don’t know how this would have gone for someone who doesn’t speak Thai.  

  • Have accommodation booked and paid for (at least 2 weeks!).  If you keep an apartment here or are staying with a Thai person, that will likely win you some points as it will make them more comfortable.  
  • They asked me to give them contact info for a Thai person and I did, but another East Asian foreigner who was standing next to me did not have to do this.  It’s entirely possible that if you don’t have a Thai person’s contact that they would still let you through eventually.  

Here’s the handout they gave everyone:

What happens when Thai people fly to CM?  

I was pulled aside immediately, but from what I could see, Thai people were able to collect their luggage and then had to line up on their way out.  I assume that their information was collected, but the line seemed more like a lecture gauntlet where a few people were telling them all the things they needed to do to stay extra safe.  They also passed out a form with all the measures that they should follow.   I was given this form as well.  It’s all in Thai and doesn’t mention self-quarantining.  

 

Thai Language Notes:

The word ข้าราชการ [khaa-ratcha-gaan] mentioned above is pretty useful.  It’s used to refer to any government full-time employee/official.   The kind of job where a person works for the government and has all the accompanying benefits like pensions and health insurance.  

 

Knee Pain

เจ็บเข่า


 

In this short Thai reading exercise, the writer tells us about how they injured their knee at the gym the other day.  Below the text is a rough translation of each sentence to help you work through it.  Start reading Thai!

เมื่อวานไปออกกำลังกายที่ฟิตเนส ช่วงนี้เพิ่งมาลองเล่นเวทดูบ้างแล้วรู้สึกว่าแข็งแรงขึ้น เริ่มคิดว่าถ้าตั้งใจเล่นน่าจะมีซิกแพคได้เหมือนกัน สควอทไปเสร็จสามเซ็ต เทรนเนอร์มาบอกให้ลองสควอทแล้วกระโดดด้วย รู้สึกว่ายากกว่าเดิมนิดหน่อยแล้วก็เหนื่อยมากแต่ก็ทำจนครบสามเซ็ต ยังไม่ทันหายเหนื่อยเทรนเนอร์สั่งให้ทำแพลงกิ้งต่ออีกสามเซ็ต เซ็ตละหนึ่งนาที พอครบก็ลงไปนอนกับพื้นแทบลุกไม่ขึ้นเลย ตอนลุกขึ้นมาน่าจะรีบไปหน่อยอยู่ดีๆก็เจ็บแปล๊บที่หัวเข่า ตอนนั้นรู้ตัวว่าเล่นไม่ไหวแล้วต้องพักก่อน เวลาบาดเจ็บที่เข่าปกติต้องพักนานกว่าจะหาย เดือนนี้ทั้งเดือนอาจจะต้องเล่นอะไรเบาๆหรือว่ายน้ำไปก่อน เซ็งเลยเพราะตั้งใจจะฟิตหุ่นไปใส่บิกินีที่ทะเลเดือนหน้า

Line by Line Breakdown:

เมื่อวานไปออกกำลังกายที่ฟิตเนส  

  • Yesterday, I went and exercised at the gym/fitness center.

ช่วงนี้เพิ่งมาลองเล่นเวทดูบ้าง

  • I just recently started trying out lifting weights

แล้วรู้สึกว่าแข็งแรงขึ้น 

  • And I feel like I’m getting stronger.

เริ่มคิดว่าถ้าตั้งใจเล่นน่าจะมีซิกแพคได้เหมือนกัน 

  • I’m beginning to think that if I really set my mind to exercising, I’ll probably be able to get a 6 pack.
  • ตั้งใจ – to intend; to intentionally (do something)

สควอทไปเสร็จสามเซ็ต 

  • I did 3 sets of squats

เทรนเนอร์มาบอกให้ลองสควอทแล้วกระโดดด้วย 

  • The trainer came over and told me to try a squat jump.

รู้สึกว่ายากกว่าเดิมนิดหน่อยแล้วก็เหนื่อยมากแต่ก็ทำจนครบสามเซ็ต 

  • I felt like it was a bit harder than before (reg squat) and I was really tired, butI still finished 3 sets.
  • Do A จน B = do something until B

ยังไม่ทันหายเหนื่อยเทรนเนอร์สั่งให้ทำแพลงกิ้งต่ออีกสามเซ็ต เซ็ตละหนึ่งนาที 

  • Before I could even recover, the trainer got me planking 3 more sets of 1 set per minute.

พอครบก็ลงไปนอนกับพื้นแทบลุกไม่ขึ้นเลย 

  • As soon as I finished all (the sets), I laid down on  the floor and almost couldn’t get up.

ตอนลุกขึ้นมาน่าจะรีบไปหน่อยอยู่ดีๆก็เจ็บแปล๊บที่หัวเข่า 

  • When I got up, I was probably hurrying a bit too much and I hurt my knee.
  • เจ็บ = pain
    • แปล๊บ – a sharp blast of pain 

ตอนนั้นรู้ตัวว่าเล่นไม่ไหวแล้วต้องพักก่อน 

  • I knew then that I couldn’t handle anymore so I took a break

เวลาบาดเจ็บที่เข่าปกติต้องพักนานกว่าจะหาย 

  • Usually, when you hurt your knee, you need to rest for for a while until it’s healed.

เดือนนี้ทั้งเดือนอาจจะต้องเล่นอะไรเบาๆหรือว่ายน้ำไปก่อน 

  • For all this month, (i’ll) probably need to take it easy(workout lightly) or swim in the meantime.

เซ็งเลยเพราะตั้งใจจะฟิตหุ่นไปใส่บิกินีที่ทะเลเดือนหน้า

  • It sucks because I’m really set on getting in bikini shape for the beach next month.

 

Paintball

In this short Thai reading exercise, the writer tells briefly about her experiences playing paintball in Hua Hin.  Some of the meaning of the sentences have been translated below.  You can use the linked google doc to see a more thorough breakdown of the vocabulary that appears in this text.

เมื่ออาทิตย์ที่แล้วได้ไปเล่นเพนท์บอลที่หัวหินกับเพื่อนๆ เราแบ่งคนออกเป็นสองทีม แต่ละทีมต้องพยายามบุกไปชิงธงของฝั่งตรงข้าม และต้องระวังตัวไม่ให้ถูกยิงด้วยเพราะถ้าถูกยิงจะถือว่าตายแล้วต้องออกจากสนามเลย ที่สนามมีชุดหมี เสื้อเกราะ หน้ากาก ถุงมือ และปืนให้ยืม

วันนั้นสนามแฉะและลื่นมากเพราะฝนเพิ่งตก ตอนเริ่มเกมเราไปแอบอยู่หลังบังเกอร์แล้วได้ยินเสียงคนยิงมาโดนถังที่ตั้งอยู่ข้างๆหลายนัด กลัวเหมือนกันแต่ก็คิดว่าต้องสู้บ้างจะมัวแต่แอบไม่ได้ พอได้จังหวะก็เลยวิ่งไปหลบข้างหลังถังใบใหญ่อีกใบนึง ตรงนี้ตำแหน่งดีมาก เห็นคนนึงโผล่หัวมาจากที่ซ่อนแล้วเขาไม่ทันระวังตัวก็เลยยิงโดนสบายๆ ตอนกำลังคิดว่าจะวิ่งไปหลบตรงไหนต่อดีก็มีเสียง “ตุบ!” แล้วก็เจ็บที่เอว เลยรู้ตัวว่าโดนยิงแล้วต้องยกมือเดินออกจากสนาม วันต่อมาก็เห็นว่าตรงเอวเป็นรอยช้ำสีเขียว กว่าจะหายเจ็บคงอีกหลายวัน

  • เล่นเพนท์บอล – to play paintball
  • แบ่งออกเป็นสองทีม – to break up into 2 teams
  • แต่ละทีม – each team
  • ต้องพยายามบุกไปชิงธงของฝั่งตรงข้าม – must try to capture the opposite (team’s) flag
  • ถ้าถูกยิงจะถือว่าตายแล้วต้องออกจากสนามเลย – if you get shot, you are considered dead and must leave the field
  • ที่สนามมีชุดหมี เสื้อเกราะ หน้ากาก ถุงมือ และปืนให้ยืม – at the field, there was bear suits, armor, masks, gloves and guns you could borrow
  • วันนั้นสนามแฉะและลื่นมากเพราะฝนเพิ่งตก – that day, the field was wet and slippery because it had just rained
  • ตอนเริ่มเกมเราไปแอบอยู่หลังบังเกอร์แล้วได้ยินเสียงคนยิงมาโดนถังที่ตั้งอยู่ข้างๆหลายนัด – when the game started, I hid behind the bunker and heard many shots hit a barrel beside me
  • พอได้จังหวะก็เลยวิ่งไปหลบข้างหลังถังใบใหญ่อีกใบนึง – as soon as I saw the right moment, I ran and hid behind a large barrel
  • ตรงนี้ตำแหน่งดีมาก here is a good position
  • เห็นคนนึงโผล่หัวมาจากที่ซ่อนแล้วเขาไม่ทันระวังตัวก็เลยยิงโดนสบายๆ ​- I saw someone poke their head up from whether they were hiding and they didn’t get back down in time and were easily taken out
  • ตอนกำลังคิดว่าจะวิ่งไปหลบตรงไหนต่อดีก็มีเสียง “ตุบ!”- as I was thinking where to go hide next I heard a “blam”
  • แล้วก็เจ็บที่เอว  – and felt pain at my waist.
  • เลยรู้ตัวว่าโดนยิงแล้วต้องยกมือเดินออกจากสนาม – I knew I had been shot so I raised my hands up and left the field
  • วันต่อมาก็เห็นว่าตรงเอวเป็นรอยช้ำสีเขียว – the next day I saw a green bruise on my waist
  • กว่าจะหายเจ็บคงอีกหลายวัน – It’ll probably be a few days before it goes away

 

Vocabulary and sentences notes.

 

Can’t read the Thai alphabet yet?

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Top 5 Most Useful Thai Phrases

Bangkok

อยู่ไหนเนี่ย

If I were to start learning Thai from the beginning all over again, these are the most useful 5 Thai phrases that I wish my first phrase book taught me. You can use all 5 of these phrases every single day and you’ll hear Thai people say them all the time.

How to Say Hello in Thai

You probably have heard of sawasdee (สวัสดี), but in real life you don’t usually use this word with you friends. It’s much more common to ask them if they’ve eaten yet. If you see them out, you’d ask them where they are going or where they are coming back from. So the next time you run into one of your Thai friends, try one of these:

ไปไหน ppai nai Where are you going?
ไปไหนมา ppai nai maa Where are you coming (back) from?
กินข้าวรึยัง gin khaao ru yang Did you eat yet?

 

How to Say “What are you doing?” in Thai

This is another short, simple and super useful Thai phrase that you should learn right away.

ทำอะไรอยู่ (thum a-rai yuu) – What are you doing?

**Notes:

  • You can add a อยู่ (yuu) after any VERB in Thai to make it function like the -ing ending in English. We don’t need to use any pronouns when it’s obvious that the speaker is talking about themselves.
    • ทำงานอยู่ (tum ngaan yuu) – I’m working
    • กินข้าวอยู่ (gin khaao yuu) – I’m eating
    • ดูหนังอยู่ (duu nang yuu) – I’m watching a movie.
    • นั่งกินกาแฟอยู่ (nang gin gaa-fae yuu) – I’m sitting having a coffee. *The word “eat” is used informally for both eating and drinking.

How to Say “Where are you?” in Thai

Whether or not you are planning to meetup with someone, it’s pretty common to ask where people are in any language. In Thai, you’ll hear it all the time and it’s a super easy phrase.

If you are speaking to a friend online/phone you just say:

อยู่ไหน (yuu nai) – where are you? / Where is it?

If you want to ask where something is or in cases where you need to specify a person, you put it/them before the phrase above:

  • แม่อยู่ไหน ​(mae yuu nai) – Where is mom?
  • กุญแจอยู่ไหน (kun-jae yuu nai) – Where is the key? / Where are the keys?​

 

 

How to Say OK in Thai

There are a few options in Thai for saying ok. You can always just say OK like we do in English, but using Thai pronunciation โอเค (ohh-kay), the main difference being that the Ohh sound tends to be longer than how you might say it in English. While this works fine in many situations, there’s a special phrase you should definitely learn.

ก็ได้ (gaw dai) – ok; I’m ok with that; that works; sounds good to me

A: วันนี้กินอะไรดี (wan nee gin a-rai dee) – What should we eat today?
B: อยากกินพิซซ่า (yaak gin pit-saa) – I want to eat pizza.
A: พิซซ่าเหรอ กินก็ได้ (pit-saa raw … gin gaw dai) – Pizza huh? Yea, I could eat (pizza) / that works

It doesn’t always translate exactly as “ok,” but it express that you are satisfied with or accepting of whatever is being talked about.

  • ไปคนเดียวก็ได้ (ppai khon diaw gaw dai) – I’m fine with going (there) by myself
  • ซื้อให้ก็ได้ (sue hai gaw dai) – I can buy it for you (I’m ok to buy it for you)
  • ไม่ไปก็ได้ (mai ppai gaw dai) – It’s ok if I/we don’t go.

 

How to Say “I don’t understand” in Thai

You may have heard of mai khao jai ไม่เข้าใจ which means “I don’t understand,” but I’m going to give you a more fun phrase that you can use when you REALLY have no idea what’s happening. If you can pronounce that เอือ vowel correctly, you can get some good laughs with this one.

ไม่รู้เรื่อง (mai ruu rueang) – I have no idea what you are talking about / I have no clue / I don’t understand at all

You use this phrase when you didn’t understand a word of what was just said, or in cases where you have no idea what someone is going on about.

Now get out there and practice these phrases. You can use them all the time forever.

How to Say Cute in Thai

how to say cute in Thai

น่ารักอ่ะ

Want to know how to say “cute” in Thai? Just like in English, the Thai word for cute can be used both with people you find attractive as things, animals and children.

The Word for Cute in Thai

The word for “cute” in Thai is น่ารัก and it consists of two parts.

น่ารัก naa rak cute

The 2nd part: รัก (rak) means “to love.”  You can read more about love talk in Thai here.

The 1st part: น่า – is placed in front of certain words to express that the target is worthy of or looks good to (eat, drink, watch, etc). Have a quick look at the examples below to get an idea how it works:

  • น่าไป (naa ppai)- looks like it’d be worth going to (if someone shows you a picture from a trip they took you might say this)
  • น่ากิน (naa gin) – looks good (for food)
  • น่าดู (naa duu) – looks like it would be worth watching or fun to watch

If you follow the above pattern, then น่ารัก (naa rak) ends up meaning something like “worthy of loving/love.”

how to say cute in Thai

น่ารักจัง

How to Say Someone/Something is Cute in Thai

Examples:

how to say cute in thai

สวยหรือน่ารัก

Cute vs Beautiful in Thai – น่ารัก vs สวย (naa rak vs soo+ay)

This is tough to answer in any language as everyone has a different idea of how these two concepts differ. “Cute,” tends to be used with young or seemingly young people and big-eyed, round-faced, puffy-cheeked and/or fluffy people, animals or things.

People will use น่ารัก to describe attractive men or boys, but not สวย.

น่ารัก can also be used to describe someone’s actions. For example, if a man buys a woman flowers for Valentine’s Day, or surprises a girl with a birthday gift, girls might respond with ขอบคุณนะ น่ารักจัง “thanks, that’s so cute.” Here they are referring to the act rather than the person.

Cute Items and Objects

Objects can both be called น่ารัก or สวย. Clothing, shoes, bags and the like can all be described using these words.

If you are talking about views, nature and most large naturally occurring things, you need to use สวย. A mountain, a view or an ocean can be สวย, but not น่ารัก. There are exceptions, of course. If someone drew a face on a small rock, for example, that could be น่ารัก.

Can’t Read Thai?

Learning to read the Thai script is the fastest and easiest way to understand the fairly complex sound system that the Thai language uses. It is the single most important part of learning to speak Thai well. It requires a 10-20 hour time investment to grasp everything you need to know, but until you learn those things, your Thai will forever be severely handicapped.

How to Say Congratulations in Thai

Congrats

ดีใจด้วยนะมึง

If you ever want to say congratulations or praise a friend in Thai for a job well done, some meaningful event or success in their life, you may want to do it in Thai. These are all the phrases you are going to need.

In Thai, there are 2 main phrases you’ll usually congratulate people with, but as is often the case in this language, you may need to adjust or change the phrase you use depending on who you are speaking with, your relationship to them and what you are congratulating them for.

How to Congratulate your Friends in Thai (Informal)

There are a two main phrases you should use and there are a few variations that are worth noting.  While they all mean the same thing, the particles we add at the end can change the feeling behind the sentence. Please note that age does matter here. If someone you are close to is considerably older than you, in most cases, you should add on the polite gender particle at the end of the sentence ครับ/ค่ะ (khrap/kha).

This can get a little tricky if you are unfamiliar with particles.  Particles are usually single words that don’t mean anything by themselves, but add some color or feeling to the sentence they are modifying much in the way intonation works in a non-tonal language.

Best Choice for Congrats

ดีใจด้วย (dee jai doo-ay) – Congrats!

Variations of Congrats:

Can't read Thai yet? Try a few free lessons from my basic Thai course.

Very Close Friends

If you are really close to someone, you may reach a point where you call each other มึง (mung).  Be very careful with this word as it will come across as very rude if you aren’t sufficiently close.  I’d recommend not using this at all until someone uses it with you.  But, keep your ears open as you’ll hear it when Thai friends speak to each other.

 

How to Congratulate Someone Older/Higher Status in Thai

In most cases, you can use the same 2 phrases, but you’ll want to be sure to always include the polite gender particle.  I feel like ยินดีด้วย (yin dee doo-ay) is slightly more appropriate than ดีใจด้วย (dee jai doo-ay) in this situation as the latter feels slightly more informal.

ยินดีด้วย (yin dee doo-ay) + ครับ/ค่ะ/นะคะ (khrap/kha/na-kha)

How to Say Congrats for * in Thai?

While often times a discussion will play out with someone telling you about their news or accomplishment and then you congratulate them, there will inevitably be times when you hear thew news second hand and want to indicate what you are congratulating them for.  We’ll still use the same phrases above, but we’ll need to add ที่ (thii) + event.

Want to REALLY Learn to Speak Thai?

A really important part of learning Thai is mastering the script and sounds.  It’s very difficult to learn the correct pronunciation using any type of English transliteration and spending a lot of time learning to pronounce sentences incorrectly is just plain silly. If you are going to learn a language, is it worth 10 hours of your time to master the sounds if it makes the rest of the journey much easier?

Try a couple free lessons from my Thai foundation course which teaches everything you need to know about the script, sound system and tone rules of Thai.

How to Order Coffee in Thai

coffee in thai

เอากาแฟเย็นแก้วหนึ่ง

If you’re a coffee or tea drinker, learning a few simple Thai phrases for ordering food and drink is going to make your life a lot easier when in Thailand. Many Thai cafes will automatically add sugar and the staff may not speak English very well so if you want to avoid your drinks being sweet or make sure there’s no milk in it, learn these Thai ordering phrases.

How to Say Coffee in Thai

First off, let’s learn how to pronounce coffee in Thai correctly.

กาแฟ consists of 2 syllables. กา + แฟ – If you can read a little bit of the Thai script, it’s easy to identify the 2 very distinct vowel sounds happening in this word. However, when we try to write it in English using transliteration we are left with something like gaa-fae which can be very misleading so I highly recommend you click on both syllables a few times and try to remember the correct vowel sound.

If you can pronounce กาแฟ, then you’re halfway to saying cafe or coffee shop. As with many types of shops in Thai, you just add the word ร้าน in front which means store or shop.

Ordering Coffee in Thai

เอา (ow) + FOOD/DRINK + (# + classifier)

If you don’t know much or any Thai yet, just start by learning the shortest easiest version. Once you’ve said this a few times and are comfortable with it, come back and learn how to add in additional informationใ

*Staff at cafes often shorten the names of the coffee drinks:

Can't read Thai yet? Try a few free lessons from my basic Thai course.
Thai sign that says "a little sweet, super sweet, just let us know!"

ไม่หวานเลย

How to Say “No Sugar” or “Not Sweet” in Thai

It’s Thailand and Thai people like their drinks SWEET so if you go to one of the many cafes that automatically adds sugar or syrup, you need to let them know if you don’t want any. You generally don’t need to use these on things like an americano at places that make real barista-type coffee, but watch out at the big Thai franchises as well as small shops which tend to automatically add sugar unless you tell them not to.

How to Say “Don’t put in milk/sugar/etc” in Thai

If your pronunciation isn’t good yet (because you haven’t learned the script) it’s a really good idea to have a backup sentence just in case you are having trouble getting understood.
These sentences say to not add in any sugar/syrup.

Non-Dairy Alternatives for Your Coffee/Tea

Apart from hipster cafes and Starbucks, it’s still not very common in Thailand for cafes to have non-dairy milk alternatives. It doesn’t hurt to ask, but you may get clueless stares back.

How to Say “I’ll have the usual” in Thai

One of the more useful phrases in Thai is เหมือนเดิม which depending on the context means something like “the usual,” or “the same as last time,” or “the same as before.” You can use this phrase once you are known to the staff a particular place. If you go to the same place a lot, they’ll likely start asking you at some point: เอาเหมือนเดิมมั้ย or เหมือนเดิมมั้ย.

เอาเหมือนเดิม (ow muan doem) – I’ll have the usual / I’ll have the same as last time

Thai Phrases for Ordering Food/Drink:

Here are a few common Thai phrases you might need while ordering food or drink at a cafe or restaurant.

Thai Vocabulary for Ordering Food/Drink

Sizes in Thai

You can use these

Starbucks Sizes in Thai