learn thai online Archives - Learn Thai From A White Guy - Learn Thai Online

How to Order Coffee in Thai

coffee in thai

เอากาแฟเย็นแก้วหนึ่ง

If you’re a coffee or tea drinker, learning a few simple Thai phrases for ordering food and drink is going to make your life a lot easier when in Thailand. Many Thai cafes will automatically add sugar and the staff may not speak English very well so if you want to avoid your drinks being sweet or make sure there’s no milk in it, learn these Thai ordering phrases.

How to Say Coffee in Thai

First off, let’s learn how to pronounce coffee in Thai correctly.

กาแฟ consists of 2 syllables. กา + แฟ – If you can read a little bit of the Thai script, it’s easy to identify the 2 very distinct vowel sounds happening in this word. However, when we try to write it in English using transliteration we are left with something like gaa-fae which can be very misleading so I highly recommend you click on both syllables a few times and try to remember the correct vowel sound.

If you can pronounce กาแฟ, then you’re halfway to saying cafe or coffee shop. As with many types of shops in Thai, you just add the word ร้าน in front which means store or shop.

How to Order Coffee in Thai

เอา (ow) + FOOD/DRINK + (# + classifier)

If you don’t know much or any Thai yet, just start by learning the shortest easiest version. Once you’ve said this a few times and are comfortable with it, come back and learn how to add in additional informationใ

*Staff at cafes often shorten the names of the coffee drinks:

Can't read Thai yet? Try a few free lessons from my basic Thai course.

How to Say “No Sugar” or “Not Sweet” in Thai

It’s Thailand and Thai people like their drinks SWEET so if you go to one of the many cafes that automatically adds sugar or syrup, you need to let them know if you don’t want any. You generally don’t need to use these on things like an americano at places that make real barista-type coffee, but watch out at the big Thai franchises as well as small shops which tend to automatically add sugar unless you tell them not to.

  • หวานปกติ (waan ppoh-ga-ti) – Normal sweet (meaning however they normally make it. Be warned.)
  • หวานน้อย (not found)
    (waan noi) – a little sweet (this is very subjective so what’s not considered very sweet to a Thai person may still be sugar overload for you)
  • ไม่หวานเลย (mai waan loei) – Not sweet at all.

How to Say “Don’t put in milk/sugar/etc” in Thai

If your pronunciation isn’t good yet (because you haven’t learned the script) it’s a really good idea to have a backup sentence just in case you are having trouble getting understood.
These sentences say to not add in any sugar/syrup.

Non-Dairy Alternatives for Your Coffee/Tea

Apart from hipster cafes and Starbucks, it’s still not very common in Thailand for cafes to have non-dairy milk alternatives. It doesn’t hurt to ask, but you may get clueless stares back.

How to Say “I’ll have the usual” in Thai

One of the more useful phrases in Thai is เหมือนเดิม which depending on the context means something like “the usual,” or “the same as last time,” or “the same as before.” You can use this phrase once you are known to the staff a particular place. If you go to the same place a lot, they’ll likely start asking you at some point: เอาเหมือนเดิมมั้ย or เหมือนเดิมมั้ย.

เอาเหมือนเดิม (ow muan doem) – I’ll have the usual / I’ll have the same as last time

Thai Phrases for Ordering Food/Drink:

Here are a few common Thai phrases you might need while ordering food or drink at a cafe or restaurant.

  • เอากลับบ้าน (ow glap baan) – I’d like it takeaway / take out
    • เอา อเมเย็นกลับบ้าน (ow ah-meh-ri-gaa-noh glap baan) – I’ll have an iced ame(ricano) takeaway
  • ทานที่นี่/ ทานนี่ (thaan thee nee / thaan nee)- I’ll eat/drink (it) here.
  • ขอพาสเวิร์ดไวไฟ – Can I have the wifi password?
  • ขอทิชชู่ (tit-choo) – Can I have a tissue/napkin?
  • ไม่เอาถุง (mai ow thung) – I don’t want a bag
  • ไม่เอาหลอด (mai ow lawt) – i don’t want a straw

Thai Vocabulary for Ordering Food/Drink

  • แก้ว (gaew) – glass; cup
  • หลอด (lawt) – straw
  • พลาสติก (phlaas-tik) – plastic
  • กระดาษทิชชู่ (gra-daat tit-choo) – napkin; tissue
    • ทิชชู่ (tit-choo) – napkin; tissue *You can say this or the full version above.

Sizes in Thai

You can use these

Starbucks Sizes in Thai

  • ทอล (taw) – tall
  • แกรนเด (graen-deh) – grande
    • I’ve heard: กรันเด กรันเด้ แกรนเด แกราเด้
  • เวน-ตี้ (wen-tee)  – venti

How to Say Sorry in Thai

When saying sorry in Thai, the words you should use will depend on the person you are speaking with and your relationship, age and status relative to them.  Until you’ve learned to navigate that, just stick to this expression:

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ (khaw thot + khrap/kha)

  • ขอ (khaw) – is used in Thai as please in the sense of asking for something from someone
  • โทษ  (thoht) – means to punish

Even though Thai people don’t think of it this way, it’s a fun mnemonic to think of saying sorry as “Please punish me.”

Saying Sorry in Thai – Polite

When speaking to people with higher status

Higher status means bosses, elders, people in respected positions.  It will also include people like your partner’s or friend’s parents.

When apologizing in Thai to people of higher status, you should say the standard phrase introduced above, but in many cases, it’s also a good idea to include a wai.  If you really messed up, this is a good way to defuse a tense situation.

ไหว้ [wai] – the wai is when you put your hands together in prayer-like position and it may or may not include a slight bow. The position of the hands in relation to the face/head as well as the deepness of the bow convey differing levels of respect.

What to say:

Saying Sorry in Informal Thai

to friends and partners

ขอโทษ

If you’re fairly close to someone (and this can happen fast), you don’t need to use the polite gender particles ครับ/ค่ะ .  The need for politeness drops off considerably at this level of intimacy.  If you aren’t sure, use it for the first few sentences and then you can tone it down or phase it out over a longer conversation.

When you need to apologize for small stuff:

  • ขอโทษนะ – sorry
  • โทษที – my bad
  • ขอโทษจ้ะ – sorry *the จ้ะ is mainly used by women

If you did something really bad or offensive and/or feel really awful about it, you want to express your apology a bit stronger.

  • ขอโทษจริงๆ – I’m really sorry
  • ขอโทษมากๆเลย – I’m very sorry

How to say Sorry in Formal Thai

This expression is very formal and not normally used in conversation, but you’ll hear it in public announcements, when you call someone on the phone and it doesn’t connect, on the BTS or other public transportation,  and you’ll find it written in signs.

  • ขออภัย – We’re sorry (for public announcements and signs)
    • ขออภัยค่ะ เลขหมายที่ท่านเรียกไม่สามารถติดต่อได้ในขณะนี้ – We’re sorry, the number you are calling can’t be reached right now.
    • ขออภัยค่ะ ขบวนรถเกิดความล่าช้า เนื่องจากอยู่ในระหว่างจัดการจราจร – We’re sorry, the train is delayed due to traffic between stations.

Saying Excuse Me in Thai

Luckily, we can use the same expression, ขอโทษ, for both “sorry” and “excuse me” in Thai.

Examples:

  • ขอโทษครับ คุณชื่ออะไร – Excuse me, what’s your name? (male speaker)
  • ขอโทษค่ะ ห้องน้ำอยู่ไหน – Excuse me, where is the bathroom? (female speaker)

Saying Sorry in Thai on Social Media / Chat / Texting

There tends to be a big drop in formality/politeness in Thai when chatting online.  However, when talking on message boards seen by a lot of people, many people will still be fairly polite and often use the polite gender particles.  When chatting with your friends on Facebook or Line, it’s not usually necessary.

  • โทษที (thot thee)- sorry *sometimes intentionally misspelled as โทดที
  • โทษๆ (โทดๆ) –  sorry
  • โทษนะ (โทดนะ) – sorry (the นะ gives it a softer, gentler feeling)
  • ซอรี่ – sorry (from English)

Saying Why you are Sorry in Thai

Often times, just saying sorry isn’t enough.  You may want to specify what you are apologizing for.  Here are some examples of different situations.

The pattern is simple enough:

ขอโทษ + ที่​​​ ​+ whatever I did wrong

sorry + for + whatever I did wrong / or whatever happened

*You can switch out ขอโทษที่ … for โทษนะ ที่ … to get a more intimate/informal version of this pattern to use with friends.

  • ผิดนัด – Showing up for an appointment late
    • ขอโทษที่มาสาย – Sorry for coming late.
    • ขอโทษที่มาช้า – Sorry for coming late.
    • ขอโทษที่ผิดนัด – Sorry for missing (our) meeting/appointment
    • ขอโทษที่ทำให้รอ – Sorry for making you wait.
  • ทำผิด – Having done something wrong
    • ขอโทษที่ทำอย่างนั้น – Sorry for doing like that
    • ขอโทษที่ทำแบบนั้น – Sorry for doing like that
    • ขอโทษที่พูดแบบนั้น – Sorry for saying (something) like that / Sorry for talking like that
    • ขอโทษที่ทำผิด – Sorry for doing (something) wrong
  • If you want to apologize for not doing something:
    • ขอโทษที่ไม่ได้โทรไป – Sorry for not calling (you)
    • ขอโทษที่ไปไม่ได้ – Sorry that I can’t go.
    • ขอโทษที่ไม่ได้ซื้อของขวัญให้ – Sorry for not buying you a gift.
    • ขอโทษที่ลืมวันเกิด – Sorry for forgetting your birthday.

How to Say “I didn’t mean to.” in Thai

ไม่ได้ตั้งใจ – I didn’t mean to. / I didn’t intend to.

  • ตั้งใจ – to decide *when used with a verb, it shows intention
  • ไม่ได้ + VERB – I didn’t VERB
    • ไม่ได้ไป – I didn’t go.
    • ไม่ได้ทำ – I didn’t do (it).

 

How to Say Sorry in Thai for Things you Didn’t Cause

When you feel bad about something that happened to someone else, such as a death in the family, you’ll use a different phrase.

  • เสียใจ
      • เสียใจด้วยนะ
      • เสียใจนะ
  • เสียใจด้วยนะที่เลิกกับแฟน – Sorry that you broke up with your gf/bf
  • เสียใจด้วยนะที่สอบไม่ผ่าน – Sorry you didn’t pass the test.
  • เสียใจด้วยนะที่หมาตาย – Sorry that your dog died.

 

5 ศัพท์สแลงไทย ที่คุณต้องรู้

ปัจจุบันมีคำศัพท์ใหม่ๆ เกิดขึ้นบนโลก Social media มากมาย นี่ก็เป็นสาเหตุที่เราจะต้องเรียนรู้สิ่งใหม่ๆ ที่เปลี่ยนแปลงรอบตัวอยู่ตลอดเวลา ซึ่งการเปลี่ยนแปลงนี้ก็มาจากยุคสมัย ที่มีการนำสื่อออนไลน์อย่าง Social media เข้ามาเกี่ยวข้อง การพูดคุยสื่อสารกันจนเป็นเรื่องง่ายดายและหลายครั้งที่มีการใช้คำศัพท์ คำย่อ ในการพูดคุยเพื่อสร้างความบันเทิงให้กัน

เพราะเราเห็นถึงความสำคัญในการเรียนรู้ ศัพท์สแลงไทย หรือ ศัพท์ที่วัยรุ่นไทยมักใช้ในการพูดคุยสื่อสารกันบนโลก Social media ในบทความนี้เราจึงพร้อมยกตัวอย่าง “ 5 ศัพท์สแลงไทย ปี 2562 ” มาให้คุณเข้าใจความหมายและสามารถใช้ตามกันได้

ตามมาดูความหมาย  “ 5 ศัพท์สแลงไทย ” กัน

เผือก = การยุ่งเรื่องชาวบ้าน

นี่ก็เป็นคำศัพท์สแลงที่วัยรุ่นไทยนิยมใช้แทนคำหยาบ ที่มาจากคำว่า เสือก แปลได้ว่า การยุ่งเรื่องชาวบ้านเช่นกัน ชาวเน็ตวัยรุ่นจึงเลือกใช้คำที่มีการออกเสียงใกล้เคียงกันเพื่อให้อีกฝ่ายเข้าใจในความหมายที่เข้าหมายถึง เช่น นาย A เป็นคนที่ชอบอยากรู้เรื่องคนอื่นไปทั่ว นาย A ก็เป็นคนที่ชอบ “เผือก” นั่นเอง

ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง, มุ้งมิ้ง, ตะมุตะมิ = น่ารัก, ทำตัวน่ารัก

คำศัพท์เหล่านี้หลายคนก็ยังมีความสับสน ซึ่งการใช้คำสแลงนี้ก็จะมีความแตกต่างกันไปแต่ละสถานการณ์ คำว่า ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง ผู้หญิงมักจะใช้กับสิ่งของ ที่ดูหวานแหวว น่ารักแบบที่สาวหวานชอบ เช่น “พวงกุญขนกระต่ายดูฟรุ้งฟริ้ง น่ารักมากเลย” ส่วนคำว่า มุ้งมิ้ง และ ตะมุตะมิ จะมีความหมายใกล้เคียงกันมากที่สุด เช่น “ดูคู่รักคู่นั้นซิ พวกเขาดูน่ารักมุ้งมิ้งมากเลย” หรือ “สองตายายคู่นี้น่ารักตะมุตะมิสุดๆ”

*สมัยนี้นิยมใช้คำว่า ฟรุ้งฟริ้ง กับกล้องถ่ายรูป เช่นกล้องฟรุ้งฟริ้ง ความหมายประมาณว่า ถ้าใช้กล้องฟรุ้งฟริ้งถ่าย รูปที่ออกมาจะสวยเนียนขาว หรือว่าหน้าจะดูสดใสหรือตัวดูผอมกว่าจริง มักจะใข้กับ selfie camera

เป๊ะเว่อร์ = สมบูรณ์แบบมาก

เชื่อว่านี่เป็นคำศัพท์ที่คุณสามารถเดาความหมายได้จากคำว่า เป๊ะ ที่แปลได้ว่า “ถูกต้อง (Exactly)” ส่วนคำว่า เว่อร์ เป็นคำขยายที่แปลว่า “มากเกิน (Over)” ซึ่งนี่อาจหมายความเชิงลบ เช่น การทำอะไรมากเกินก็ได้ แต่เมื่อเรานำมารวมเข้ากับความหมายเชิงบวกอย่างคำว่า เป๊ะเวอร์ ก็จะหมายถึง “สมบูรณ์แบบที่สุด! หรือ เลิศเลอเพอร์เฟ็กต์ (Nailed i!)” ยกตัวอย่าง คุณนกแต่งตัวมางานอีเว้นท์คืนนี้ได้เป๊ะเว่อร์ หมายความว่า คุณนกแต่งตัวคืนนี้ได้สวยสุดๆ นั่นเอง

งานดี = หน้าตาดี

หากคุณเคยไปสังสรรค์หรือไปงานปาร์ตี้กับเพื่อนสาว บางครั้งคุณอาจจะได้ยินคำนี้หลุดมาจากปากเพื่อนสาวอยู่บ่อยครั้ง เมื่อผู้หญิงเจอคนที่หน้าตาดี ก็มักจะอุทานออกมากับเพื่อนสาวด้วยกันว่า งานดี ยกตัวอย่าง แจนเห็นผู้ชายที่เธอชอบ เธอเลยถามเพื่อนเธอว่า ผู้ชายคนนั้นงานดีหรือเปล่า? หรืออีกตัวอย่าง แฟนของแจนงานดีมากอ่ะ ก็หมายถึง แฟนของแจนหน้าตาดีหรือหล่อนั่นเอง

มองแรง = การมองแบบสายตาโกรธเกรี้ยว

คำสแลง มองแรง คำนี้เป็นคำที่ออกแนวเชิงลบ “เมื่อคุณทำให้ใครโกรธคุณขึ้นมา จนเข้าหันกลับมามองคุณด้วยสายตายโกธเกรี้ยวหรือไม่พอใจ” นั่นก็คือ การมองแรง เป็นอีกคำศัพท์วัยรุ่นที่ใช้แทนอารมณ์นี้การส่งข้อความผ่าน Social Media เพื่อให้เพื่อนของคุณสามารถเห็นภาพอารมณ์ของคุณได้ นอกจากนี้แล้ว การมองแรง ยังสามารถแปลเป็นการอิจฉาได้อีก เช่น แจ๋วซื้อกระเป๋ามาใหม่และโพสลงใน Facebook แล้วมีเพื่อนมาคอมเม้นต์ว่า มองแรง ซึ่งนี่ก็จะแปลได้ว่า “อิจฉา เป็นการหยอกเล่น” นั่นเอง

ทั้งหมดนี้ก็เป็นการใช้ 5 ศัพท์สแลงไทย ที่คุณควรเรียนรู้ เพื่อใช้ในการสนทนาพูดคุยได้อย่างสนุกสนานมากขึ้นกับคนท้องถิ่น ที่ซึ่งการเรียนรู้คำศัพท์เหล่านี้ก็จะทำให้คุณสามารถเข้าหาและตีสนิทผู้คนได้เป็นอย่างมาก

 

How to Determine the Tone of a Thai Word

How to determine tone of a Thai word?

Each syllable gets its own tone and there are a few steps we need to take to find out the tone of a word in Thai.  If you aren’t yet familiar with what tones there are in Thai or how a tonal language works, start here.

First, we need to determine the CLASS of the syllable or word.  We do this by having memorized the Middle and High Class letters so we can identify them instantly.  If it’s not Middle Class or High Class, it must be Low Class.  If you haven’t already done so, start with the MIDDLE CLASS STORY which will help you tie together the 7 most important middle class consonants.

  • Step #1: The class of the first letter determines the the class of the word.  This rule applies even if the first letter of the word is silent.
  • Step #2: Check the word for any “modifiers.”  There are 2 types of modifiers: TONE MARKS and HARD ENDINGS.
  • Step #3: Apply rules for consonant CLASS + STATE.

There are 3 possible “states” for a Thai word or syllable.  Each “class” or group has a formula to follow once you know the state of the word.  Remember, CLASS = the group of letters of which there are 3 in Thai.  STATE refers to whether or not the word/syllable has any modifiers.  There are 2 types of modifiers: TONE MARKS and HARD ENDINGS.  If a word has no modifiers, it will always take the DEFAULT tone for its consonant CLASS.  If it has a modifier, you will need to apply the rule for that consonant CLASS + the corresponding rule.  Read this paragraph a couple of times.  It’s not as hard as it sounds, but you probably won’t get it on your first read through.

  1. Default
  2. Has Tone Mark
  3. Has Hard Ending

The tricky part is that each class has its own default starter tone and its own set of rules.  Middle and High class are very similar which is why we want to master them first.  Low class turns everything upside down and is considerably more difficult so it’s a good idea not to even get into it until you have completely mastered the middle and high class rules. If you want to do it the easy way, than at least have a look at my course which holds your hand and guides you though all of this.

Default tones for each class: =

  • Middle Class = Mid Tone
  • High Class = Rising Tone
  • Low Class = Mid Tone

Did you ever study trigonomotry?  I didn’t until I was at university here in Thailand and I was very surprised to see that Thai works in a similar way.  When you look at a word, you have to determine which of the 3 classes(groups of letters) that the word is a part of.  This is based on the first letter of the word (even if it is a silent letter).  Then, you go follow the formula for that CLASS.  So if we take a couple middle class words as  examples:

บ้าน = house

  1. What class is บ ? = Middle Class
  2. Does it have a tone mark? = Yes (middle class + 2nd tone mark = Falling Tone)

ไก่ = chicken

  1. What class is ? = Middle Class
  2. Does it have a tone mark? = Yes (middle class + 1st tone mark = Low Tone)

ตาย = to die

  1. What class is ต? = Middle Class
  2. Does it have a tone mark? = No
  3. Does it have a hard ending? = No
  4. Default tone = Mid Tone (We checked for 2 modifiers.  There were none so we apply the default tone for Middle Class)

จาก = from

  1. What class is จ? = Middle Class
  2. Does it have a tone mark? = No
  3. Does it have a hard ending? = Yes (Middle Class + Hard Ending = Low Tone)

Now practice it until your eyes bleed!  Mastering the process =  Mastering the tone rules

Still don’t get this stuff?  Consider joining thousands of other learners and taking my 50+ lesson Thai foundation course, Read Thai in 2 Weeks which covers everything you need to get started towards fluency in Thai.   Yes, you can learn the script and sound system in a couple of weeks with the right tools.

  • จาน
    จาน
    mid tone
  • แจก
    แจก
    low tone
  • จ้าง
    จ้าง
    falling tone
  • จอด
    จอด
    low tone
  • จ่าย
    จ่าย
    low tone
  • จน
    จน
    mid tone
  • All Done!

 

Learn To Read Thai

Learning to read again in a new language can seem rather daunting, even painful at times.  Even after you’ve gotten comfortable with the Thai script and can learn how the Thai tone rules work,  moving on to longer sentences and eventually short texts can be intimidating.

I spent a couple of years crazily trying to read whatever Japanese books I could get my hands on. Manga, language learning theories, fiction, old literature, etc. What I’ve discovered is that it was a mistake to read manga  or whatever solely because it was manga (or because I heard lots of Japanese learning websites recommend doing so) and it was in Japanese. I just wasn’t couldn’t get into it.   If you are going to invest a lot of time in something, it’s better to spend lots of time trying to read things that you might enjoy.  Be picky.  Because of the enormous amount of time and exposure required, we want to spend as little time as possible being bored and/or frustrated

What I ended up doing is trying to re-read many of the books I read when I was younger.  And when I was a kid, I read lots of Stephen King. So, I went to amazon.jp and ja.wikipedia.org and started to read about Stephen King books that I’ve read in the past and know pretty well. Reviews, summaries, character descriptions, etc. And its been great. Even though every single page has plenty of words that I don’t know, I know enough that can skip as many of those words as I want. I mine everything for sentences of things that I want to see again in my SRS. But the two most important things going on here are that I’m enjoying reading, and I am READING. I only read as long as it stays interesting. If I start spacing out or getting bored or frustrated…I do something else, or go look for something else to read. I can always come back to the current one if I feel like it or just try again tomorrow.

So anyways, I’ve devoured a lot of Stephen King stuff in the past few days and tonight I’m poking around summaries of Star Wars and Robocop. I also really wanna get my hands on some of the Jp translations of SK’s books. (I eventually did)

Anyways, how does this help you? Well, I’d say Thai is more limited than Japanese as far as I know in regards to translations from English when it comes to books. However, there are loads of movies and tv series to work with. So as I’m writing this, Lost is on tv so I figured that was good enough to start with. If you watch that, or Prison Break, Heroes some other show (the early version of this post was written in 2012!), we might have some material to work with.  If there isn’t a Thai wiki for whatever show/movie you’d like to read about, just Google it.  There’s always some Thai people talking about any popular drama out there somewhere.  If you don’t care about tv and movies, then read wiki pages and blogs about whatever interests you.  Find translations of books you read a long time ago and try and read them again in Thai.  You’ll probably remember some of the story which makes it a lot easier to access.  There will likely be loads of words that you don’t know and that’s ok.  Just work out what you can and don’t look up every word.  The important stuff will keep appearing.

So again, how do we go about reading this stuff when we still suck?  Let’s look at a few sentences and how we can break them down into smaller chunks that we might want to put in our notes (and/or flashcards if you use them).

First sentence from the Prison Break Wiki
Prison Break เป็นซีรีส์แอ็กชัน ดราม่า ทางโทรทัศน์ ออกอากาศครั้งแรกทางช่องฟ็อกซ์
This one is full of SRS goodness. What have we got?

Prison Break เป็นซีรีส์ – PB is a series

Prison Break เป็นซีรีส์แอ็กชัน PB is an action series

Prison Break เป็นซีรีส์ดราม่า PB is a drama series

Prison Break เป็นซีรีส์ ทางโทรทัศน์ PB is a tv series

PB เป็นซีรีส์ออกอากาศครั้งแรกทางช่องฟ็อกซ์ – PB is a tv series that was first broadcast on/by Fox.

Get the idea yet? Let’s look at the the first line from the Lost Wiki. A bit longer you may notice.

Lost เป็นดราม่าซีรีส์ที่อเมริกา ที่มีเนื้อหากล่าวถึงผู้รอดชีวิตจากอุบัติเหตุเครื่องบินตก บนเกาะลึกลับ

See anything from the Prison Break sentence in this one?

Lost เป็นดราม่าซีรีส์ – Lost is a drama series

Lost เป็นดราม่าซีรีส์ที่อเมริกา – Lost is a drama series in America

Lost เป็นซีรีส์ ที่มีผู้รอดชีวิตจากอุบัติเหตุเครื่องบินตก = Lost is a series about survivors of a plane crash

Lost เป็นซีรีส์ ที่มีผู้รอด เครื่องบินตก บนเกาะ – Lost is a series of plane crash survivors on an island

บนเกาะลึกลับ – on a mysterious island

Tear apart the sentence until its only got 1 thing it in you don’t know. And if you are still trying to practice reading at a basic level then keep the phrases really short, but don’t waste time with single words. Words out of context are forgotten too easily. There isn’t anything wrong with having a few of the same sentence with only one word changed.

Now, go try and skim through a few of those. Set goals.  Do a few sentences like this each day.  You don’t need to make flashcards for everything.  But, it’s often worth noting down stuff that you see a lot of and want to remember or anything that jumps out at you. Its always ok to delete flashcards and toss your notes.   And when you get up into the thousands it’s a good idea.